mfarias's blog

Share
mfarias

The New Year is almost here! This Sunday night, 2017 will officially be over and a whole new year will begin. If, like us, you feel in need of some advice on how to properly approach 2018, we offer up a few lessons from The Gentleman’s New-Year’s-Gift: or Serious Advice to a Nephew (1792).

Share
mfarias

As the year comes to a close and we pass through the holidays, your Redwood Librarians have been revisiting some of our favorite treasures in our collection as we make plans for the new year. These treasures include two illuminated manuscripts by James Eddy Mauran (1817-1888) of Newport.

Share
mfarias

This week's blog post comes from Redwood Library intern and student at Salve Regina University, Christian Isidoro, who has spent the fall semester at the Redwood working with our Newport Collection of photographs. His valuable work scanning, analyzing, and describing these photos will be accessible online soon and new stories about Newport can be told, like the one he is sharing with us today.

Share
mfarias

This Thanksgiving weekend, once you’ve had a chance to recover from your feast, we hope you enjoy this round-up of some of our favorite early 20th century Thanksgiving postcards, which were given to the Redwood Library by local bibliophile and former bookstore owner Don Magee. The majority of the cards were sent between 1908 and 1916 and have a turkey sitting front and center, but there are a lot of variations on that theme.

Share
mfarias

Artistic inspiration is often ephemeral and intangible, but it can also be drawn from the physical world and collected into portfolios and scrapbooks full of ideas. At the Redwood Library, we have two examples of such inspiration from the architect Whitney Warren (1964-1943).

Share
mfarias

Opening the Redwood Annals to the earliest days of the Library always encourages me to make connections between now and then. As we pass through the first week of November, adding books to our collection and starting new projects, our forebears at the Redwood Library were doing the same. At a meeting held on November 4, 1747, 270 years ago as of this weekend, “The Company met in the Council Chamber” and made decisions that continue to be relevant to our work today.

Share
mfarias

As the spookiest night of the year approaches, your Redwood Librarians are preparing the only way we know how, by reading everything we can find on witchcraft and demonology on our shelves. We have pulled two books on these subjects from our special collections to share with you and hopefully alleviate any witch- or demon-based fears you may have about this Halloween season.

Share
mfarias

Small collections can provide a wealth of information about a person’s character, preserved for us in a few scribbled lines in a note written over a hundred years ago. Such is the case with our manuscript collection of Jane Stuart (1812-1888), American painter and daughter of Gilbert Stuart (1755-1828). In the collected letters at the Redwood, she entreats a woman to join her for lunch and sends several notes of regret to another and in doing so, helps to sketch out an idea of who she was as a person, beyond her well-known artistic talents.

Share
mfarias

Our portraits may be our most visible art collection, greeting visitors in every room, but the Redwood Library is also home to several collections of artistic works on paper. This week, the spotlight falls on our holdings of the works of Alfred Bendiner (1899-1964), which were given to the Redwood Library by the Alfred and Elizabeth Bendiner Foundation in 1996. Bendiner was an architect, a muralist, a caricaturist, an author, and a world traveler whose work shows his many talents and interests with humor.

Share
mfarias

Many of the men and women whose portraits line the walls of the Redwood Library are the descendants of families who have been in New England since its earliest days. Joseph Hurlbut Patten (1801-1881), the son of Reverend William Patten (1766-1839) and Hannah Hurlbut (1769-1855), is proof of this regional lineage on both his father’s and his mother’s sides, each with long histories in the area.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - mfarias's blog