Redwood Journal

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What was happening in the year 1876? Reconstruction, the first phone call, and the publishing of Dr. Christopher Dresser's book "Studies in Design." Click here to read more.

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Redwood Staff

Ever wonder about the portraits adorning the walls in the Rovensky Room? Click here to read about a local celebrity from the American Revolution, Mary "Polly" Lawton.

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Redwood Staff

The Redwood Library’s extensive 3M eBook catalog grants patrons access to nearly 800 titles in popular fiction, mystery and non-fiction. Here, the Redwood Staff recommend a few must-read titles.

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Redwood Staff

Did you know that the Redwood owns a first edition copy of "Uncle Tom's Cabin"? Click here to read more!

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Redwood Staff

Happy Halloween from the Redwood Library! Click here to read more.

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Redwood Staff

Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft relates the devilish activities and pranks of demons, witches and other supernatural creatures. Need help getting rid of a pixie? How about those troublesome werewolves? This book is a collection of letters from Sir Walter Scott to his son-in-law, J.G. Lockhart. Click to read more about the supernatural in the nineteenth century.

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Redwood Staff

Abraham Redwood (1709-1788), founder of the Redwood Library, made his fortune on a sugar plantation in Antigua. By his mid-thirties, he was able to retire as the second wealthiest man in the colonies, and chose Newport as his home. Click to learn more about the founding father of the Redwood Library.

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Redwood Staff

Attributed to an eighteenth century English book binder, the "disappearing" fore-edge painting reached its peak in the early nineteenth century. Thanks to the generosity of our members, another beautiful fore-edge book was recently donated to the library.

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Redwood Staff

The Redwood Library’s extensive 3M eBook catalog grants patrons access nearly 800 titles in popular fiction, mystery and non-fiction. Here, the Redwood staff recommend a few must-read titles.

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anonymous

It’s probably fair to state that historical New-England Protestant sacred music, or psalmody, is today a niche interest. However, psalmody, or the choral setting of (typically) psalms in rounds, fugues and anthems, amounted to the most diverse selection available to students enrolled in 18th century community 'singing schools', popular in New England's more densely-settled areas including here in Newport. Indeed in the heavily religious culture of the time, music-making was primarily for spiritual uplifting; secondly, as entertainment for various civic, community or religiously motivated observations in the meetinghouses or the city square.

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