Redwood Journal

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Redwood Staff

Abraham Redwood (1709-1788), founder of the Redwood Library, made his fortune on a sugar plantation in Antigua. By his mid-thirties, he was able to retire as the second wealthiest man in the colonies, and chose Newport as his home. Click to learn more about the founding father of the Redwood Library.

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Redwood Staff

The Redwood Library’s extensive 3M eBook catalog grants patrons access nearly 800 titles in popular fiction, mystery and non-fiction. Here, the Redwood Staff recommend a few must-read titles.

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Redwood Staff

Attributed to an eighteenth century English book binder, the "disappearing" fore-edge painting reached its peak in the early nineteenth century. Thanks to the generosity of our members, another beautiful fore-edge book was recently donated to the library.

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Redwood Staff

The Redwood Library’s extensive 3M eBook catalog grants patrons access nearly 800 titles in popular fiction, mystery and non-fiction. Here, the Redwood staff recommend a few must-read titles.

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anonymous

Violinist and composer Bernhard Molique (1802-1869) was born into an amateur musical family in Nuremburg, Germany. His father was a non-salaried town musician who tutored the child prodigy on various instruments, most importantly the violin which the young Molique gravitated towards; so much so that at the age of 14 he was briefly tutored by the then-renowned violinist and composer Louis Spohr.

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anonymous

It’s probably fair to state that historical New-England Protestant sacred music, or psalmody, is today a niche interest. However, psalmody, or the choral setting of (typically) psalms in rounds, fugues and anthems, amounted to the most diverse selection available to students enrolled in 18th century community 'singing schools', popular in New England's more densely-settled areas including here in Newport. Indeed in the heavily religious culture of the time, music-making was primarily for spiritual uplifting; secondly, as entertainment for various civic, community or religiously motivated observations in the meetinghouses or the city square.

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anonymous

I particularly enjoy recordings that introduce musical oddities from the 'grand masters’. For example, most know the beauty and complexity of Beethoven’s later quartets; the awe-inspiring, out-of-this-world

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anonymous

The popularity of the Viola da gamba (or 'viol of the leg') peaked in the Baroque period, and although it has achieved a modicum of recent popularity, it is not considered part of the standard roster of chamber or orchestral instruments.

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anonymous

If you visit our music CD section in the next few weeks and months, you'll notice that we are in the process of reclassifying and moving our music compact-discs to the compact-disc furniture stacks located in the 2005-renovation wing (where you’ll also find the non-fiction circulating books). This move will allow us expansion of our ever-popular mystery genre books, and, in addition, we hope the new CD classification schema will make it easier for members to locate their desired choices.

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