Redwood Journal

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Redwood Staff

The American Civil War was one of the bloodiest and most hotly contested conflicts of our country’s history. Perhaps that is why, over 150 years later, we are still fascinated and humbled by the actions of our fellow countrymen.The photographs taken during the war are not only emotionally charged and sometimes unsettling, but also provide us with valuable information about the daily life of military men and civilians.Click to see more.

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Redwood Staff

A new face will be hanging in the Rovensky Room. Click to read more about Robert Johnston, the newest addition to the Redwood portrait family, known for his numerous contributions to the Library.

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Redwood Staff

The New York Times began publishing the “Mid-Week Pictorial War Extra” in September1914, three months after the beginning of the First World War, as a Wednesday photographic supplement to its main publication. This weekly circular provided the American public with up-close views of the front long before smart phones, live-streaming and the internet. Click here to see more from this week, 99 years ago.

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Redwood Staff

Despite the number of prominent men on the walls of the Redwood, there are also some key female figures that have figured into the history of not only the library, but the early formation of our country. Follow the link to read our last installment of the Ladies of the Library series.

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Redwood Staff

Ready for another look at the paintings hanging on our walls? Click here to read about the women in the Redwood Library & Athenaeum portrait collection.

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Redwood Staff

With the recent attention that famous women, past and present, have been generating lately – from Hilary Clinton to Harriet Tubman – we thought it appropriate to discuss the women in the Redwood Library’s portrait collection. Most of the ladies pictured were wives of prominent men, and as such there is little to no recorded information about their personal lives. However, women have a way of making their mark on history whether or not any men are paying attention. Read more here.

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Redwood Staff

Sarah Chauncey Woolsey, pen name Susan Coolidge, was a Newport resident and Civil War nurse. We recently rediscovered some early editions of her work in our Children's Library. Click here to read more!

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Redwood Staff

Henry Collins, once called the Lorenzo di Medici of Rhode Island, died a pauper and is buried in an unmarked grave in the Common Burial Ground. How could such an influential man meet such an end? Click here to find out!

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Redwood Staff

“The ballot, the most perfect weapon yet devised of moral and intellectual power. We do not wish to take it from the hands of any man; we would put it into the hands of every woman.” Click here to read more about Julia Ward Howe and the Women's Suffrage Movement.

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Redwood Staff

Wondering what we have in our collection that belonged to the Redwood Family? Click here to see documents from the Collection of Redwood Family Papers.

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