Collection Development: New & Noteworthy eBooks

Sun, 12/06/2015 - 1:30pm -- Redwood Staff

The Redwood Library’s extensive 3M eBook catalog grants patrons access to nearly 800 titles in popular fiction, mystery and nonfiction. Here, the Redwood Staff recommend a few must-read titles.

 

Black Diamonds by Catherine Bailey

 

When the sixth Earl Fitzwilliam died in 1902, he left behind the second largest estate in twentieth-century England, valued at more than £3 billion of today’s money—a lifeline to the tens of thousands of people who worked either in the family’s coal mines or on their expansive estate. The earl also left behind four sons, and the family line seemed assured. But was it? As Bailey retraces the Fitzwilliam family history, she uncovers a legacy riddled with bitter feuds, scandals (including Peter Fitzwilliam’s ill-fated affair with American heiress Kick Kennedy), and civil unrest as the conflict between the coal industry and its miners came to a head. Once again, Bailey has written an irresistible and brilliant narrative history.

 

Reviews:

 

“While this will be an easy sell to Downton Abbey fanatics, this fascinating history is highly recommended to anyone who loves family gossip and mystery,” writes Library Journal.

 

“The goings-on at Wentworth are inevitably reminiscent of the fictional Downton Abbey...but they are at once grander, more sordid and generally harder-edged… A jolly good read.” – The Washington Times

 

Hard News by Jeffery Deaver

 

Rune is an aspiring filmmaker with more ambition than political savvy, paying her dues as an assistant cameraperson for the local news. But she's got her eyes on the prize, the network's hot newsmagazine, Current Events -- and she's got the story she knows will get her there. Poking around in the video archives, Rune spots a taped interview with Randy Boggs, who's doing hard time in Attica for a murder he claims he didn't commit. Rune can't say exactly why, but she's sure he's innocent. If she can prove it, Current Events won't merely report the news, it'll make news -- and Rune's career. But what she could be writing is Randy Boggs's epitaph -- and her own. Rune's newly discovered witness soon turns up dead. A hit man from Miami is on Rune's trail, and Boggs is finding prison even more dangerous than before. Someone wants this story killed, and it could be the girl with the camera who ends up on the cutting room floor.

 

Reviews:

 

“Deaver's background as a journalist helps him to vivify the competitive, even back-stabbing caste system of network news,” says Publisher’s Weekly. “He writes with clarity, compassion and intelligence, and with a decidedly human and contemporary slant.”

 

“Peerless entertainment" adds Kirkus Reviews.

 

Girl, 20 by Kingsley Amis

 

Kingsley Amis, along with being the funniest English writer of his generation was a great chronicler of the fads and absurdities of his age, and Girl, 20 is a delightfully incisive dissection of the flower-power phase of the 1960s. Amis’s antihero, Sir Roy Vandervane, a conductor and composer who bears more than a passing resemblance to Leonard Bernstein, is a pillar of the establishment who has fallen hard for protest, bellbottoms, and the electric guitar. And since vain Sir Vandervane is a great success, he is also free to pursue his greatest failing: a taste for younger and younger women. Highborn hippie Sylvia (not, in fact, twenty) is his latest infatuation and a threat to his whole family, from his drama-queen wife, Kitty, to Penny, his long-suffering daughter.

 

Reviews:

 

“For satiric ends the cast of characters has been adroitly shaped to expose a sort of folie à deux in which youth and an aging misleader of youth contribute equally to the mischief,” describes The New York Times.

 

“As always, Amis’s aim at the modern world, not to mention eternal human foibles, is dead on,” adds Los Angeles Times.