Collection Development: New & Noteworthy eBooks

Sun, 11/15/2015 - 12:00pm -- Redwood Staff

The Redwood Library’s extensive 3M eBook catalog grants patrons access to nearly 800 titles in popular fiction, mystery and nonfiction. Here, the Redwood Staff recommend a few must-read titles.


Dry Bones by Craig Johnson


The latest installment of Craig Johnson’s New York Times bestselling Longmire series—the basis for the hit drama series LONGMIRE now on Netflix.


When Jen, the largest, most complete Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton ever found surfaces in Sherriff Walt Longmire’s jurisdiction, it appears to be a windfall for the High Plains Dinosaur Museum—until Danny Lone Elk, the Cheyenne rancher on whose property the remains were discovered, turns up dead, floating face down in a turtle pond. With millions of dollars at stake, a number of groups step forward to claim her, including Danny’s family, the tribe, and the federal government. As Wyoming’s Acting Deputy Attorney and a cadre of FBI officers descend on the town, Walt is determined to find out who would benefit from Danny’s death, enlisting old friends Lucian Connolly and Omar Rhoades, along with Dog and best friend Henry Standing Bear, to trawl the vast Lone Elk ranch looking for answers to a sixty-five million year old cold case that’s heating up fast.


“Johnson, as usual, offers colorful glimpses of Wyoming history and its physical features. Johnson is able to make the landscape itself at least as fascinating as the slightly off-kilter, and sometimes murderous, folks that inhabit Walt’s universe,” says Denver Post.


“[Walt Longmire] remains tough, smart, honest, and capable of entertaining fans with another difficult, dangerous case,” adds Kirkus Reviews.


The End of the Cold War: 1985-1991
by Robert Service


The Cold War had seemed like a permanent fixture in global politics, and until its denouement, no Western or Soviet politician had foreseen that an epoch defined by games of irreconcilable one-upmanship between the world’s most heavily armed superpowers would end in their lifetimes. Under the long, forbidding shadow of the Cold War, even the smallest miscalculation from either side could result in catastrophe.


“Recommended for political scientists, historians, Cold Warriors, and those who value diplomacy,” says Library Journal.


Kirkus Reviews calls the book a “thoughtful re-evaluation of a stunning historical watershed… A wholly satisfying, likely definitive, but not triumphalist account of the end of an era.”


Atonement by Ian Mcewan


On a hot summer day in 1935, thirteen-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses a moment’s flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant and Cecilia’s childhood friend. But Briony’ s incomplete grasp of adult motives–together with her precocious literary gifts–brings about a crime that will change all their lives. As it follows that crime’s repercussions through the chaos and carnage of World War II and into the close of the twentieth century, Atonement engages the reader on every conceivable level, with an ease and authority that mark it as a genuine masterpiece.


“Brilliant. . . . McEwan could be the most psychologically astute writer working today, our era’s Jane Austen,” says Esquire.

 

The Economist calls it a “work of astonishing depth and humanity.”