Fashion: A Reading List

Tue, 05/22/2018 - 3:35pm -- baglio

Throughout history, fashion has been a major part of the daily lives of endless amounts of individuals. The function of fashion, whether it is for practical purposes, or for display purposes has not changed; rather the changes and adaptations to styles of fashion are constantly in motion. This reading list will not only be aesthetically pleasing to the eye, but give a better understanding in to what fashion is, and what it means in different periods in history.  Take one of these great titles home, and get to know fashion a little better!

 

Fashioning Fashion: European Dress in Detail, 1700-1915

By,  Sharon Sadako Takeda

Luxurious textiles, exacting tailoring, and lush trimmings abound in this glorious volume that celebrates the evolution of European dress through two centuries.

Fashion is in the details. The textiles, tailoring, and trimmings all work together in the creation of the finest pieces. Drawing on the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s internationally known fashion collection, this gorgeous book tells the story―in words and beautiful pictures―of fashion’s aesthetic and technical development from the Age of Enlightenment to World War I, a period when fashionable dress underwent sweeping changes. Many remarkable examples of men’s, women’s, and children’s garments are featured here for the first time, including an extraordinarily rare 1790s man’s vest designed to promote sympathy with the French Revolution; a stunning 1845 black satin gown from the royal court of Portugal heavily embroidered with gold; and an 1891 evening mantle with silk embroidery, glass beads, and ostrich feathers designed by French couturier Émile Pingat. An invaluable resource for anyone interested in the evolution of fashion, this generously illustrated book provides a rich visual history of the changes that occurred in fashionable dress spanning a period of more than two hundred years. 

 

Fashion: The Definitive History of Costume and Style

By, Susan Brown (Smithsonian)

Tracing the evolution of fashion — from the early draped fabrics of ancient times to the catwalk couture of today — Fashion: The Definitive History of Costume and Style is a stunningly illustrated guide to more than three thousand years of shifting trends and innovative developments in the world of clothing.

Containing everything you need to know about changing fashion and style — from ancient Egyptian dress to Space Age Fashion and Grunge — and information on icons like Marie Antoinette, Clara Bow, Jacqueline Kennedy, and Alexander McQueen, Fashion catalogs the history of what people wear, revealing how Western fashion has been influenced by design from around the world and celebrating costume and haute couture.

Fashion will captivate anyone interested in style — whether it's the fashion-mad teen in Tokyo, the wannabe designer in college, or the fashionista intrigued by the violent origins of the stiletto and the birth of bling.

Edwardian Fashion 

By, Daniel Milford-Cottam

Renowned for its graciousness and elegance, the fashions of the 1910s would undergo some quite revolutionary changes. In the early years of Edward VII's reign fashionable ladies wore delicately colored, flower-and-lace-trimmed trailing gowns over tight corsets, accessorized by elaborate hairstyles. Women scoured the new fashion magazines to see the new designs from Parisian couturiers, such as Worth and Jeanne Paquin. From around 1906, these excessively luxurious fashions began to fade away, with a new designer, Paul Poiret, causing a stir with his richly colored column gowns and turbans. By 1914, women's wear was transformed with women wearing boldly colored, dramatically stylized Eastern-inspired kimono wraps, slender hobble skirts, ankle-skimming tunic dresses and turbans. Daniel Milford-Cottam explains these new developments in fashion, and how different fashions were worn by both the most fashionable ladies, and those on more limited budgets. The book will also look at the evolution of men's wear during this period, including the development of the more modern three-piece suit and more relaxed, less formal menswear.

 

What Clothes Reveal: The Language of Clothing in Colonial and Federal America : The Colonial Williamsburg Collection 

By, Linda Baumgartem

Paintings of upper-class men and women tell an important part of the history of costumes, but surviving garments themselves reveal even more. Every crease, stitch and stain in a piece of clothing supplies information about its wearer and its era. This volume features 18th- and early 19th-century garments from the collection of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Illustrated with more than 300 colour photographs, including many details and back views, the book treats not only elegant, high-style clothing in colonial America but also garments for every day and work, the clothing of slaves, and maternity and nursing apparel. Drawing on contemporary written descriptions and on actual costumes of the period, the text analyzes what Americans in the 18th century considered fashionable and attractive and how they used clothing to assert status or to identify occupations. It also examines the myths and meanings of clothing in British and American society, clothing for the entire life cycle, and a history of clothing alteration. There are informative sidebars on a variety of topics.

 

Clothing Art: The Visual Culture of Fashion

By,  Aileen Ribeiro

There have always been important links between art and clothing. Artists have documented the ever-evolving trends in fashion, popularized certain styles of dress, and at times even designed fashions. This is the first book to explore in depth the fascinating points of contact between art and clothing, and in doing so it constructs a new and innovative history of dress in which the artist plays a central role. 

Aileen Ribeiro provides an illuminating account of the relationship between artists and clothing from the 17th century, when a more complex and sophisticated attitude to dress first appeared, to the early 20th century, when the boundaries between art and fashion became more fluid: haute couture could be seen as art, and art used textiles and clothes in highly imaginative ways.  Her narrative encompasses such themes as the ways in which clothing has helped to define the nation state; how masquerade and dressing up were key subjects in art and life; and how, while many artists found increasing inspiration in high fashion, others became involved in designing “artistic” and reform dress.  Sumptuously illustrated, Clothing Art also delves into the ways in which artists represent the clothes they depict in their work, approaches which range from photographic detail, through varying degrees of imaginative reality, to generalized drapery.  

 

The Language of Clothes

By, Alison Lurie

 The classic book about the clothes we wear and what they say about us.

Even before we speak to someone in a meeting, at a party, or on the street, our clothes often express important information (or misinformation) about our occupation, origin, personality, opinions, and tastes. And we pay close attention to how others dress as well; though we may not be able to put what we observe into words, we unconsciously register the information, so that when we meet and converse we have already spoken to one another in a universal tongue.

Alison Lurie, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, is our savvy guide and interpreter on this tour through the history of fashion. She provides fascinating insights into how changing sex roles, political upheavals, and class structure have influenced costume. Whether she is describing the enormous amount of clothing worn by early Victorian women or illuminating the significance of the long robes worn by aging men throughout history to connote eminence, her analysis is playful, clever, and always on target.

 

Twentieth-century American Fashion

By, Linda Welters and Patricia Cunningham

Americans began the twentieth century standing in Europe's sartorial shadow, yet ended by outfitting the world in blue jeans, T-shirts and sneakers. How did this come about? What changes in American culture were reflected in fashion? What role did popular culture play? This important overview of American fashion in the twentieth century considers how Americans went from imitating British and French fashion to developing their own sense of style. It examines such influences on dress as class, jazz and hip hop, war, the space race, movies, television and sports. Further, the book shows how gender, psychology, advertising, public policy, shifting family values, the American design movement and expertise in mass production profoundly influenced an American style that has been exported across the globe. From New York City's Bohemians to Hollywood's stars, Twentieth-Century American Fashion reveals the continuing importance of clothing to American identity and individual experience.

 

The Anatomy of Fashion: Dressing the Body from the Renaissance to Today 

By, Susan J. Vincent

Clothes take the ordinary human body and fashion it into something remarkable. Born to the same anatomical legacy, each generation has used garments to shape itself in the image of its own particular desires.

Taking different body parts in turn, The Anatomy of Fashion invites us to view ourselves as we have been in the past. Arguing that analysis needs to aspire to the proliferation and playfulness of fashion itself, the chapters both explore a different aesthetic and examine its wider, and often surprising, implications. In countless different ways, fashion is caught up in the larger picture of its chronological moment. Whether in the mechanisms of production, the politics of consumption, the construction of sexuality or gender, or the formation and reformation of manners and morals, fashion is there.

In its provocative conclusion The Anatomy of Fashion turns its attention to dress practices today. Reassembling the anatomical parts, the text places the contemporary body in the historical view and reveals the strangeness that lies at the heart of our own normality.

 

Looking for Jackie: American Fashion Icons

By, Kathleen Craughwell-Varda

A fascinating chronicle of fourteen trend-setting women of fashion and style throughout American history since 1800, including Jackie Kennedy, Dolley Madison, Katherine Hepburn, and Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte, discusses how their personal styles set the standard for American women. 15,000 first printing.

 

The Politics of Fashion in Eighteenth-Century America (Gender and American Culture)

By, Kate Haulman

In eighteenth-century America, fashion served as a site of contests over various forms of gendered power. Here, Kate Haulman explores how and why fashion--both as a concept and as the changing style of personal adornment--linked gender relations, social order, commerce, and political authority during a time when traditional hierarchies were in flux. 

In the see-and-be-seen port cities of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Charleston, fashion, a form of power and distinction, was conceptually feminized yet pursued by both men and women across class ranks. Haulman shows that elite men and women in these cities relied on fashion to present their status but also attempted to undercut its ability to do so for others. Disdain for others' fashionability was a means of safeguarding social position in cities where the modes of dress were particularly fluid and a way to maintain gender hierarchy in a world in which women's power as consumers was expanding. Concerns over gendered power expressed through fashion in dress, Haulman reveals, shaped the revolutionary-era struggles of the 1760s and 1770s, influenced national political debates, and helped to secure the exclusions of the new political order.

 

Cocktail Culture: Ritual and Invention in American Fashion, 1920-1980

By, Joanne Dolan Ingersoll

This catalog is published to accompany the exhibition Cocktail Culture: Ritual and Invention in American Fashion, 1920-1980, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island, April 15-July 31, 2011

 

Vogue Fashion: 100 Years of Style by Decade and Designer

By, Linda Watson

Published in association with Vogue magazine, Vogue Fashion is the definitive style bible for everyone interested in the past, present and future of fashion. It takes a fresh look at fashion history, charting the evolution from corsets to 21st-century trends.

This stylish book chronicles all the significant designers, developments and movements of more than a hundred years of fashion -- from the 1920s flapper through the war years, from Christian Dior's New Look to the Swinging Sixties, from New Romanticism to punk to postmillenium styles. Among current designers featured are Vera Wang, Roberto Cavalli, Luella Bartley, Zac Posen, Roland Mouret and Viktor and RoIf.

An A to Z section highlights over 250 of the greatest designers of all time -- the men and women who have inspired, created and altered the course of fashion. Illustrated with many eye-catching archival images, Vogue Fashion also features the work of the photographers who have helped immortalize seminal fashion moments.

Vogue Fashion is an informative and inspirational look at how fashion reflects and projects social mores and individual values.